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Spring Refresh: Magdalena Restaurant’s Laws and Lilies Cocktail

05/18/21

Created by Emmanuel West, Director of F&B, The Ivy Hotel

Ingredients

  • 1.5 ounces Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Whiskey
  • 1.0 ounces Triple Crown Syrup
      • 3 parts Rare Tea Cellars Earl Grey Tea
      • 1-part Rare Tea Cellars Mint Meritage Tea
      • 32 ounces (by volume) Granulated Sugar
      • 32 fluid ounces Hot Water
          • Put tea into tea sachets (if available)
          • Layer into Sugar
          • Top with Hot Water
          • Stir occasionally to dissolve sugar.
          • Allow to steep until cool.
          • Strain out tea/tea sachets.
  • 0.5 ounces Ramazzotti Aperitivo Rosato
  • 1 piece Hibiscus Flower in Syrup, drained and halved (for garnish)
  • 1 piece Orange Peel, a strip with pith removed (for garnish)
  • 1 piece skewer (for garnish)

Directions

  • Fill a glass mixer with ice. Add Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Whiskey, Syrup and Rosato. Stir with a cocktail spoon. Strain into a rocks glass over a large cube. Garnish with Hibiscus Flower and Orange Zest.

Inspiration

Inspired the by the names of great jockeys whom you will probably never know…

In 1889, George “Spider” Anderson became the first black jockey to win the Preakness on a horse named Buddhist. This was the same year the historic Gilford-Painter mansion was constructed.

Isaac Murphy won the Kentucky Derby three times.

Willie Simms won the Belmont Stakes in 1893 and 1894. He won the Kentucky Derby in 1896 and 1898. He won the Preakness in 1898-winning 2 of the esteemed Triple Crown races.

Ethos:

Naming a cocktail should stimulate our guests. With this cocktail, Laws and Lilies, we hope to provoke a question and start a conversation. We hope by asking “what’s in a name” our guests will afford us the opportunity to revisit a history that has been excluded…; to bring attention to the contributions of Black people in the history of the United States, in so many facets, and to become a more consistent part of our evolving understanding of our society, culture and nation.

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